Monthly Archives: October 2009

Innovation Velocity

Developing Agile Innovation Leadership through Gaming by Simon Evans and Victor Newman The Problem with Innovation It is a truism that armies tend to continue to fight their last war and need to go through bitter learning experiences before they can understand and adapt to the new, emergent rules of conflict. Present innovation thinking is constrained by legacy successes achieved ...

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Are engineers good for innovation?

I have been pondering on this since I had some comments on my The Faces Of Open Innovation post where I expressed some concern that most of the profiles working with open innovation had an engineering background. In the blog post, I mentioned that engineers do add value to innovation, but we need to get a broader focus in the ...

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Managing Your Innovation Gap

Once you have a systematic and routine way to innovate, you are confronted with a new problem – how to decide how much innovation is enough. For many, this is an odd question. If innovation is essential for survival and growth, most people would want all the innovation they can get. But that is oversimplifying. Too much innovation can overload ...

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How Understanding Customer Jobs turns Crowdsourcing into Smartsourcing

Crowdsourcing is becoming a part of many companies’ innovation strategy. But crowdsourcing suffers from a number of problems that limit its effectiveness. By selecting ’emerging customers’ – who are better at spotting winning innovations – and helping them innovate around unmet customer needs, crowdsourcing can be turned into smartsourcing. Leading companies like Cisco already use smartsourcing to identify tomorrow’s winning ...

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When it comes to innovation, trust your intuition

MBA students are taught to treat business in a rational, scientific way. They analyze situations, develop financial models, critically examine management decisions and logically examine different scenarios. When they emerge from the hallowed halls of academia, they are often surprised to find that businesses run much less on logic and much more on emotion. It is not cold, intelligent analysis ...

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Can entrepreneurs lead us out of this crisis?

I agree with Tom Hayes and Michael Malone in their belief that “Entrepreneurs Can Lead Us Out of the Crisis.” Why? Because entrepreneurs have the agility, flexibility, and grit to make change happen. Innovation is the chief tool of the entrepreneur. Hayes and Malone outline about a half dozen ways the new administration can help them. And those ways are ...

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