Monthly Archives: October 2010

Americans Obsession With Numbers

Here is a wonderful article by Rupert Cornwell on American’s obsession with statistics — or what Charles Seife, NYU Professor, has deftly named “proofiness” — “the art of using bogus mathematical arguments to prove something that you know in your heart is true — even when it’s not.” Charles and Rupert are in good company. Approximately 9 out of 10 ...

Read More »

Social Software – What Is Your Intent?

Union Square Ventures’ Fred Wilson wrote a post titled Social Layers and Social Intention. In it, he asked why the simple, 140-character maximum Twitter has succeeded, while the more ambitious FriendFeed ultimately failed to make it big. His answer? Because FriendFeed was largely a social aggregator whereas Twitter is a service with specific social intent. “Specific social intent”. Yes, that’s ...

Read More »

The United States Needs More Innovation

I’ve just come across the National Science Foundation’s (NSF) survey from 2008 on Business R&D and Innovation. This was a study conducted by the NSF across a wide swath of US firms of all sizes and industries. The results should scare you. I’m surprised they haven’t been front page news. The results suggest that about 1 in 5 manufacturers indicate ...

Read More »

Innovation Commitment and Resource Allocation

It is common in organizations for any type of project, but even more problematic in innovation: the resource allocation issue. How many times have you encountered the following problem: Top management is now really committed to innovation Very serious idea generation methodologies and innovation management processes and tools in place Many interesting ideas generated, people enthusiastic, management enthusiastic But, many ...

Read More »

3 Powerful Words You Should Be Using Everyday

Our pastor, Fr. Don Cullen, was teaching an adult religious education class recently, talking about lessons learned in more than three decades of religious life. One lesson was when a child hands you a picture he or she has made, starts to tell you about it, and then looks for your reaction, the correct thing to say is, “Tell me ...

Read More »

More Medicine for Your Complexity Complex

It seems like I touched a nerve with my two recent blogs on complexity. The feedback I’ve received from clients and business associates reinforces my belief that managing complexity represents one of today’s most compelling leadership issues. With that in mind, here are some more strategies for keeping your organization ahead of the complexity curve: Identify your thought bubbles. Thought ...

Read More »

Sandbox Innovation

More Tips for Remarkable Ideas by Paul Williams The lead at your last brainstorm session probably preambled with something like this: “Remember team, there is no such things as a bad idea in brainstorming. And there are no boundaries. Let the sky be the limit!” They were correct. Yet, the process of coming up with ideas to solve, grow, think ...

Read More »

Tempting Innovation, Tainted Innovation

An idea stands a better chance of surviving if it is not attributed to the individual who conceived it. Otherwise, the idea carries with it all the baggage and perception of its owner, good or bad. During idea evaluation, people struggle separating their feelings about the creator from the idea itself. If they like the person, they like their idea… ...

Read More »

Recognizing and Rewarding Innovation

You need to consider your reward programs carefully before you launch idea campaigns or other innovation initiatives. You need to consider what kind of behavior and which kind of results that should be rewarded and you need to consider how to reward this. I believe most companies really long for an organization full of self-motivated employees that see innovation as ...

Read More »