Monthly Archives: November 2010

Backwards Field Trips

Field trip! What child doesn’t get excited when a teacher proclaims these magic words? The permission slip is the first thing out of the backpack. I remember counting down the days until the day finally arrived. You can probably still remember those school adventures like they were yesterday. Who wouldn’t jump at the chance to get out of the boring ...

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You Must Forgive AND Remember Failure

In this excellent blog post Stanford University professor, Robert Sutton, points out that it’s not only critical that leaders forgive failure; it’s also vital that they remember it as well so that the organization can learn from mistakes. Sutton writes that, “A vital difference between good and bad bosses is that the former consider it their responsibility to surface and ...

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Help is Not a Dirty Word

As much as some people won’t want to hear this, “help” is not a dirty word. Rather asking for help is a sign of maturity as a leader. So my question is this: Are you easy to help? Think about it…do you make it easy for others to want to help you, or is your demeanor such that most people ...

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Are you checking your Innovation Pulse?

So often our innovation health seems to change abruptly or equally just simply slip away. It could be caused by many things: a call for reorganization or restructuring or a key part of the team decides to leave. It might be the organization has a second quarterly drop in sales and profits or those layoff simply keep cutting away until ...

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Tablet Market Dominated by Apple iPad – For Now

Microsoft just posted a really good quarter and has been openly criticized for its lack of strategy in the tablet market and other consumer market. This software giant has failed to innovate in many fronts despite massive resources and strong talent based. The company has also failed to create any buzz on their product launches; you wonder what is not ...

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Why Open Innovation is Not for Small Companies

It is difficult to find good cases on how smaller companies have engaged with open innovation. It is also difficult to give strong advice on how such companies should engage with open innovation. I have reflected much on this and I am approaching a conclusion that is slightly provocative: Open innovation is for big companies; not small companies. Let me ...

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Innovative Pricing Model Drives App Store Success

In the early days of the Apple App Store, there were free apps and there were paid apps. With the release last year of the iPhone 3.0 software, Apple began to support “in-app purchases”, and there were great expectations (and a little trepidation) that it would help developers make more money off of their apps by offering them for free, ...

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Boring Meetings – Boring Innovations

There is something seriously wrong with the way we rent meeting space. Does anyone else notice it? Problem No. 1 – We don’t care where we meet. Standard practice for an off-site meeting is to pick a city then ask the admin or specialist to ring up a few hotels to book rooms for the team and then book a ...

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A Call to Arms for Engineers

Engineers make magic. We are the only ones who create things from nothing: cars, televisions, bridges, buildings, machine tools, molecules, software… (You get the idea.) Politicians can’t do it, lawyers can’t do it, MBAs can’t do it. Only engineers. And the stuff we create is the foundation of sustainable economies. We create things, our companies sell them for a profit, ...

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Is your social community contaminated?

Recently I found myself at the W Hotel in Hoboken, accidentally (no really!) listening to an interesting story on one of the many breakfast shows on at that time. On that show, author James Fowler was describing research he had done that showed how social networks surrounding us can impact each of our lives in a much deeper way than ...

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