Monthly Archives: January 2011

All That is Remarkable About Innovation

Like many of you I participate in the social media world. That world has opened up new relationships and new sources of information for me that were completely unexpected. I’ve learned a lot from individuals on Twitter and Facebook and Linkedin, and I’ve become a real believer in the use of social media to support innovation. I was following a ...

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Building the Innovation Business Case

One of the toughest aspects within Innovation is making the Business Case. Much of the information is imperfect, the returns are often fuzzy and unclear in the early stages and the doubters line up ready to block and deter new ideas from entering the commercialization process. Justifying new innovation to others can often be really hard. How can you reduce ...

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3 Things You Must Know About Your Customers

Every great product, every successful sales & marketing plan, starts with the customer. As you build product and go-to-market plans moving forward, make sure you can crisply answer these three questions: Who is our customer? You want a crisp definition here, a solid profile and/or persona that tells your entire team who you’re building for and selling to. Who are ...

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December's Top Ten Innovation and Marketing Articles

Last year I experimented with a Top Ten list at the beginning of each month, profiling the ten posts from the previous month that generated the most traffic to Blogging Innovation, and people seemed to like it. So, without further ado, here are December’s ten most popular innovation or marketing posts: 13 Tips to Maximize Your Social Media Productivity – ...

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Trust is Everything in Innovation

How relevant is Trust in enterprise innovation? Let’s piece together an answer with the help of some field research. Three of five executives at this year’s Front End of Innovation Summit in Boston shared one reason for attending: “I am looking for ways to create a culture of innovation…we are just not there yet!” Eli Lilly’s CEO John Lechleiter recently ...

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The Good Thing About Bad Ideas

One of the inevitable things you will hear at a brainstorming session is “there are no bad ideas.” Well, guess what? There are plenty of bad ideas. Nazism, for instance. Arena football. Bow ties. What well-meaning “keep hope alive” brainstorming lovers really mean is this: Even bad ideas can lead to good ideas if the idea originators are committed enough ...

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Inexorable Rise of Open Innovation and Crowdsourcing

Imagine that you are planning a big surprise party. You want it to be entertaining, spectacular, memorable and different. You could plan and project manage every element of the party yourself: the theme, venue, music, food, drink, entertainment, games, diversions etc. Or you could involve a number of people to help you with their ideas and their skills. One person ...

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Innovation Lessons from the Beatles

Be Prolific and Focused by John Steen Tim and I are now writing a lot on the importance of focus. Being successful with innovation is about managing the paradox of ‘disciplined creation’ and it helps to have some clear ideas about what you are trying to achieve and how you are going to create value. Part of this discipline is ...

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Innovating Athletic Shoes

The athletic footwear market is maturing, so it will need sustained innovation to keep growing. “Performance footwear” emerged with the ancient Greeks and has since grown to a $50 billion global industry. Innovations such as vulcanized rubber, high tops, arch support, specialized functions, endorsements, and branding have kept the industry vibrant and growing, especially for the dominant three players: Nike, ...

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Innovation and Creative Destruction

Did you know that at the turn of the last century in 1900, there were over 100,000 workers employed in this country as carriage and harness makers; men and women who made their living solely off of the manufacture and maintenance of horse-drawn carriages. With the rapid rise of the automobile in the early twentieth century, those employment numbers went ...

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