Be Careful When Managing Up

by Mike Myatt

Be Careful When Managing Up“Managing Up” is a great catch phrase and an interesting concept – it’s also a practice that can get you in deep trouble rather quickly if misunderstood or misapplied. Many people would say the purpose of managing-up is to have the by-product of your efforts enhance the work of those you report to. While I have nothing against this concept (I call it doing your job), I do have a problem with the reality that many practitioners of managing-up miss the point altogether. When the practice of managing up gets confused with promotion of self-interest, brown-nosing, deceit, manipulation, the gymnastics of corporate climbing, or other mind games, a good theory rapidly becomes twisted resulting in a false and dangerous reality.

While the premise of “managing-up” is sound, the reality of how it’s most commonly implemented is representative of everything that’s wrong with business today. It’s human nature to attempt to control circumstances where possible. It’s also quite normal to desire to position yourself well with those you report to. That said, it’s important to understand the realities, rules and boundaries associated with organizational structure. Newsflash – as much as you don’t want to hear this, there is a good reason why you’re reporting to someone else – you’re probably not ready to be the boss yet.

Here’s the thing – the best way to be looked upon favorably by those you report to is not through various charades and other forms of skulduggery, but by simply doing your job and serving them well. When the emphasis of your efforts shifts away from others and to yourself you have placed yourself on a very slippery slope. If you want to move up in the organization let it be the quality of your work that catapults you upward, not your skill in manipulation. If your timetable for career acceleration isn’t matching up with that of your employer, surface your concerns with them in a straight-forward fashion, don’t revert to amateurish corporate hi-jinks.

If I might be so bold, it’s not your job to manage your boss. Most good leaders love to be challenged, but I don’t know to many who like to think their being managed by subordinates – there’s a subtle but distinct difference. Your responsibility is to do the job the way those above you want it done, not how you want to do it. Granted, in a perfect world there would be alignment between the two, but alas, the world is not perfect. When it comes to enhancing the efforts of those above you, I would encourage you to think about it like this:

  • Engage – Yes
  • Collaborate – Yes
  • Challenge – When needed
  • Advise – Where appropriate and value is added
  • Object – When it’s the right thing to do
  • Loyalty – Until it’s no longer earned (if you can’t be loyal – go work for someone else)
  • Manage – NEVER

There is little debate that some subordinates are more intelligent and gifted than those above them. In fact, if you’re lucky enough to be considered a high potential in your organization, you might want to give your boss some credit as the best leaders make every attempt at building their organizations with people who are brighter and more talented than they are. This is a laudable practice that should be admired by workers, not resented. If your work doesn’t speak for itself, or if it does and isn’t being recognized, rather than play silly games, move on honorably and look for a better fit.

Thoughts?

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Mike MyattMike Myatt, is a Top CEO Coach, author of “Leadership Matters…The CEO Survival Manual“, and Managing Director of N2Growth.

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  1. I totally agree that “managing up” is often a euphemism for the most pernicious forms of politicking. However, it does have its place. For example, when a manager employs a subordinate who has greater knowledge or skills than the manager in a particular, it is incumbent on the subordinate to guide the manager with respect to that area. The problem comes with the subordinate moves from helping the manager to manipulating the manager.

  2. If you don’t do account management as a contractor, you will get burned. Your client cannot tell you what you need to know, like what they hell they want done.

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