Monthly Archives: March 2012

Lin-sanity, Innovation and The Educated Gut

Though I'm not a Knicks fan, I must admit that I've been caught up in "Lin-sanity": the meteoric (and still very early) rise of Jeremy Lin, an unheralded, journeyman bench player who several weeks ago was on the verge of another cut but has put together the most impressive start for a player's first 5 games in the past 40 years. Better than Bird, Jordan or Lebron. Who could have guessed?

Read More »

Personal Innovation – Shine Your Star

I had a nice conversation with a friend from London today that I haven't spoken with in a while and we got onto the topic of careers. We started talking about my article on Personal Innovation and how in most professional occupations there are the stars and then there is everyone else. We talked about how stars in certain professions might only be 5% better at something than their peers but get paid 5x to 50x more than the rest...

Read More »

Dr. Feynman’s 6 Principles of Trendspotting

Is it possible to predict the future? Apparently, Richard Feynman could. He dreamed up some of the today’s most exciting technologies, like nanotech and quantum computing, decades ago. Moreover, these weren’t mere daydreams or flashes of inspiration; he foresaw how they would actually work, what problems would have to be overcome, etc.

Read More »

The Diversity of University Tech Transfer Strategy

At the risk of stating the obvious, all universities are similar, but each one is different. Just when you think you’ve got a key piece of university tech transfer strategy figured out -- like peeling the proverbial onion -- you unearth another layer you haven’t even considered. (Actually, in this case, onions are much too stolid and predictable – maybe raking leaves on a windy day would be a better analogy.)

Read More »