Monthly Archives: April 2012

Evocative Potential of Words

There is a story of masterful innovation in the reinvention work of Donald Jackson who creates words that pick up the life and energy of his hand and gives them a physical feeling through the wetness of the ink. He is the royal scribe and calligrapher to the Queen of England. And, just as an architect builds a sacred space, Donald’s most recent work has produced a sacred space captured and reflected in a book.

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Reset the Web

Mobile isn’t merely a new stage in the evolution of the web, it’s not even merely a new context, it’s the very early stages of an entirely new system. A system that has already started to shape our environment, affect the way we live, how we choose to connect with others, and how we’re able to spend our time. A system that is also slowly unravelling our assumptions and causing us to question the very reason we build web sites, why people visit them, and where the true value of the web actually lies.

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Innovation from Disabilities

These pictures show personalities that we probably recognize easily. King George VI, British King during World War II; Albert Einstein, inventor of the theory of general relativity; Ray Charles, soul musician and singer; Ludwig Van Beethoven, German composer and pianist; Helen Keller, American author, political activist and lecturer; and Thomas Edison, inventor of the light bulb, the phonograph, the motion picture camera (just to highlight a few of his 1093 patents). Yet, there is something that these personalities have in common – disabilities.

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Mandatory Ranking of R&D – a growing debate

What if the unthinkable happened and the U.S. government imposed a mandatory and public ranking of research universities and individual faculty according to their "research excellence?" Just to be clear, I’m not advocating ...

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Innovation Lessons from the Outcome of the Netflix Prize

You probably heard about the contest that Netflix started in 2006 to crowdsource improvements in their recommendation algorithm. They offered a $1 million prize to anyone that could improve the accuracy of the recommendation algorithm by at least 10%. In 2009, a team of people hit the target, and won the prize. Awesome, right? The team got their big check, Netflix got their performance improvement, and everyone ended up happy. Well, sort of.

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