Monthly Archives: November 2015

Stop Frustrating Your Innovators

A study among US companies shows that employees of corporations are eager to be entrepreneurial. More than half of those surveyed (52 percent) have pursued an entrepreneurial idea within their company. But what they lack, is support from their management. Only one in five employees feels supported by their management to be entrepreneurial.

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Seven Steps to a More Creative Organization

First, how do you bring diverse knowledge and insights into the organization to create these unexpected connections? Second, how do you ensure that the creative ideas generated are relevant to your business? Third, how do you support a business process that seems fuzzy and turn it into reproducible steps that invite broad contribution?

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Innovation and The Art of Implementation (Part 3)

Innovation without implementation is mere ideation. And buyer beware: this “mere” ideation can often be expensive, morale-killing, and potentially business-imploding. To prevent getting infinitely stuck in the ideation phase wasteland, remember that innovation typically doesn’t fail due to a lack of creativity but rather due to a lack a discipline.

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How Can You Innovate Better with the 3 Questions Startups Always Ask?

Does the Startup innovation strategy apply, in full or in part, to established organizations and business in other industries? Although some strategy consultants may fancy the idea of every company in the world to get back to their startup age, I find it preposterous as well as unnecessary. It is in managing uncertainty where the old guys can learn valuable and interesting lessons from the young crew.

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Introducing the Play-to-Win Strategy Canvas 2.0

I started developing a visual tool for team facilitation of strategy development over two years ago, after I learned the Playing to Win framework from Roger Martin. I’ve always liked using good old paper and Post-Its, ever since I learned what was affectionately referred to as “the big paper process” when I was working with Toyota many years ago. After ...

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