Author Archives: Greg Satell

Innovation Isn’t About Control, But Access

Completed in 1928, Henry Ford’s River Rouge plant was a marvel of its age. It was almost 100% vertically integrated, even producing its own steel and by the 1930s over 100,000 employees worked there, producing nearly every component for the cars that Ford built. It was, at the time, considered to be a key advantage. Nobody makes factories like that ...

Read More »

What Will We Do After Moore’s Law Ends?

In 1965, Intel cofounder Gordon Moore published a remarkably prescient paper which predicted that computing power would double about every two years. For a half century, this process of doubling has proved to be so remarkably consistent that today it is commonly known as Moore’s Law and has driven the digital revolution. In fact, we’ve become so used to the ...

Read More »

Don’t Break Down Silos, Connect Them

Nobody likes a silo. Or a stovepipe for that matter. These insular structures restrict the flow of information, which makes it hard to coordinate action and adapt to change. In some cases, it can even lead to disastrous consequences like the General Motors ignition switch scandal. So it should be no surprise that managers try to break down silos whenever ...

Read More »

Time to Take the Quantum Age Seriously

Time to Take the Quantum Age Seriously

Every new technology has the capacity to inspire wonder and fear. One Swiss scientist, Conrad Gessner, warned in the 1500’s that the data overload from the printing press would be “confusing and harmful” to the mind. Similar concerns have been voiced about every conceivable advancement, from the train and car to computers and social media. The truth is that technology ...

Read More »

Don’t Worry About People Stealing Your Ideas

Chester Carlson worked on his idea for years. It was tough, messy work and when his wife tired of the putrid smells, sulfur fires and occasional explosions emanating from the kitchen, his experiments were exiled to a second floor apartment in a house his mother-in-law owned. It took years, but he came finally up with a working prototype. He tried ...

Read More »

Build For The Few And Not The Many

When Google first announced its Glass prototype, complete with a snazzy video, it generated a lot of excitement. Through augmented reality projected onto the lenses, users could seamlessly navigate an urban landscape, send and receive messages and take photos and videos. It was a completely new way to interact with technology. Yet criticism quickly erupted. Many were horrified that hordes ...

Read More »

Designing Workspaces To Solve Problems

Apple’s new campus, Apple Park opened to both adulation and criticism. The Los Angeles Times’ architecture critic, upon seeing the original design, called it a “retrograde cocoon.” USA Today pointed out that opening up a glitzy new headquarters is often a signal of impending decline. Wired isn’t sure if it’s insanely great or just insane. One thing that everyone can ...

Read More »