Author Archives: Jeffrey Phillips

Innovation Is Too Easy

Jeffrey-Phillips

Hmm. I bet the post title got your attention, but of course in this modern age of digital content we bloggers need headlines that pop through all of the noise and gain attention. It helps, of course, that I'm of the opinion that the headline is provocative, and has, as Kissenger once said, the added benefit of being true.

Read More »

Train, Apply, Repeat

Jeffrey-Phillips-1

So the question of the day is: can innovation be learned, or "taught"? The underlying assumption is that innovation is inherent, a creative spark that one is either born with or cannot hope to possess. The rationalist in all of us considers this unusual and unfair. Certainly everyone can "learn" to innovate, no?

Read More »

Innovation Magnetism

Magnet0873

Did you ever play with magnets when you were a kid? Wasn't it interesting to discover how powerful small magnets were when you connected the negative pole of one magnet to the positive pole of another magnet? I can't help returning to a constant theme I've developed over the years - the idea that inertia and complacence are two of the biggest impediments to innovation.

Read More »

If You Give an Innovator an Idea, He'll Want to Launch It

From my experience, it seems that everyone thinks about innovation, but they think about it in very discrete, disconnected ways. R&D folks think about innovation as creating a new polymer. Marketing folks think about innovation as changing a marketing channel or delivering a new product. What very few people think about are the knock-on effects, consequences and series of events that are required to unfold when you innovate.

Read More »

You Are What You Innovate

Hand holding light bulb isolated on black

In many philosophical circles, the mantra behind much of the belief system is that you are what you (think, eat, do, believe). In dietary circles, you are what you eat. Is it also the case that you "are what you innovate" or is it often the other way round? I think in many cases we actually "innovate what we already are".

Read More »

The Critical Missing Component for Innovation Success is…

Jeffrey-Phillips

Police dramas often focus on three key aspects of a crime: means, motive and opportunity. If one or more of these are missing or can't be discovered, the chances of solving a crime are bleak. These are some of the "critical" components to solving a crime. Similarly, innovation has some "critical" components that in our experience are often incomplete, if not completely absent.

Read More »