Author Archives: Paul Sloane

Developing an Innovation Vision

You cannot expect your team to be innovative if they do not know the direction in which they are headed. Innovation must have a purpose. It is up to the leader to set the course and give a bearing for the future. This is set in broad terms and is described as the mission, core purpose or vision for the ...

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Innovation Strategy – Fight the Fear of Change

People are naturally apprehensive about change. They fear the unknown. There is a reluctance to take risks. This can be particularly true in a successful enterprise. Success can be an enemy of innovation. Why mess with a model that works? There is little incentive to take risks and try new things. But even successful companies are at risk if they ...

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Innovation Strategy – What business are we in?

The CEO of Black and Decker once said, “People don’t go into a DIY store because they need one of our drills. They go because they need a hole in the wall.” Wonderbra in their internal communications to staff say this, “We do not sell underwear. We do not sell lingerie. What we sell is self-confidence for women.” Harley Davidson ...

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Customer Resistance to Innovation

Sometimes the biggest resistance to innovation comes from the person who should benefit most from it – the customer. Customers can be very conservative. When you come along with an unorthodox new product or service they are often initially unimpressed. Why should the buyer take a risk with your unproven new gizmo? He knows that new products often have bugs ...

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When it comes to innovation, trust your intuition

MBA students are taught to treat business in a rational, scientific way. They analyze situations, develop financial models, critically examine management decisions and logically examine different scenarios. When they emerge from the hallowed halls of academia, they are often surprised to find that businesses run much less on logic and much more on emotion. It is not cold, intelligent analysis ...

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Unleash Your Inner Genius

Ten great ways to boost your personal creativity by Paul Sloane Let’s say you are wrestling with a tough issue – maybe at work, at home, with your children or in your social life. You have been stuck for a while and you can’t seem to make a breakthrough. You want to come up with some really creative ideas. What ...

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Innovation and Quality – Allies or Enemies?

Can quality and creativity cohabit in the same house or are they natural enemies? Can a quality process be applied to innovation? Let’s start with the first question. Quality involves the removal of unwanted variations, the enforcement of strict standards and controls, the application of best practice and the elimination of waste and errors. Creativity and innovation involve exploring many ...

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How to Ruin a Brainstorming Session

The brainstorming session is the most popular group creativity exercise in business. It is quick, easy and it works. But many organizations have become frustrated with brainstorms and have stopped using them. They say this group ideation technique is old-fashioned and no longer effective. But the real reason for their frustration is typically that the brainstorming meetings are not facilitated ...

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Are You Crushing Creativity?

CEOs have much more power than they realize. They can patiently create a climate of creativity or they can crush it in a series of subtle comments and gestures. Their actions send powerful signals. Their responses to suggestions and ideas are deciphered by staff as encouragement or rejection. If you want to crush creativity in your organization and eliminate all ...

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Personal Innovation – Profiting from Uncertainty

How can you ensure that in turbulent times you not only survive the organizational restructuring but actually benefit by it? Most businesses are having to change not once but over and over in order to meet the challenges of recession, competition and technology convergence. Some changes are all about cutting costs, although they may be called something else. Others are ...

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