Author Archives: Ralph Ohr

Innovation and Serendipity

I have pointed out the importance of diversity for innovation and organizational adaptability. Diversity is a crucial precursor to serendipity. In the Power of Pull, John Hagel, John Seely Brown and Lang Davison emphasize the rising need for serendipity...

Read More »

Innovation and Diversity

"Tomorrow's management systems will need to value diversity, dissent and divergence as highly as conformance, consensus and cohesion" -- a tweet by Gary Hamel leads Ralph Ohr into the importance of Innovation and Diversity.

Read More »

Customer's Role in Breakthrough Innovation?

There has been quite a lot of discussion recently about a post by Jens Martin Skibsted and Rasmus Bech Hansen, titled “User-Led Innovation Can’t Create Breakthroughs; Just Ask Apple and Ikea”. Their major claim is: "Great brands lead users, not the other way around." As expected, this lead to controversial discussions in terms of customer’s role in the process for innovation. The response reminded me of the reaction to one of Roberto Verganti’s polarizing posts.

Read More »

Innovation – Matching Needs and Solutions

While revisiting some collected innovation readings, I recognized that it might be important to briefly emphasize again one “fundamental”: the distinction between needs and solutions. According to Christian Terwiesch, co-author of “Innovation Tournaments”, innovation is defined as “… a new match between a need and a solution so that value is created.” The novelty can be in the solution, in ...

Read More »

Innovation and Human Capabilities

John Steen wrote a series of  posts on why experts and crowds usually miss disruptive innovation and how to use networks to tap expertise and knowledge. I’d like to expand these thoughts a bit more towards the question: what’s the role of human capabilities in innovation? For elaboration, I’m going to combine two concepts I’ve recently come across: In a ...

Read More »

Is innovation a matter of age?

Jose Baldaia and I have started an interesting discussion, ignited by a post titled ”Too Young To Know It Can’t Be Done” by Steve Blank. Blank claims that most of the technology innovations were built by people in their 20’s with a few of innovators in their 30’s. His main argument is: “One of the traps of age is growing ...

Read More »