Tag Archives: Neuroscience

Storytelling, the Brain & Work Culture

I love the quote by the poet Muriel Rukeyser that says “The universe is made of stories, not atoms.” Humans live for stories. We learn from stories at home, school, from friends, and also very compellingly at work. Humans within a work culture are motivated by stories. Look at the famous founding myths of HP and Apple in the garages, of Fred Smith and FedEx, and ...

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BEST OF TED: Brain-to-Brain Communication Has Arrived. How We Did It

You may remember neuroscientist Miguel Nicolelis — he built the brain-controlled exoskeleton that allowed a paralyzed man to kick the first ball of the 2014 World Cup. What’s he working on now? Building ways for two minds (rats and monkeys, for now) to send messages brain to brain. Watch to the end for an experiment that, as he says, will go to "the limit of your imagination."

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Neuroeducation: 25 Findings Over 25 Years

It’s been 25 years since the field of neuroeducation first reared its head in academia. Spearheaded in 1988 by the Psychophysiology & Education Special Interest Group, educational neuroscience is now the focus of many research organizations around the world. To celebrate the progress of this monumental discipline, we have compiled a list of the 25 most significant findings in neuroscience education over the past 25 years.

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Selfish Innovation

Could we deliver better innovation results from our workshops by appealing to the inherent selfishness of our participants? This question comes to mind for the innovator reviewing the results of new research in neuroscience concerning human behavior in the activity of self-expression.

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