Tag Archives: Science

Innovate Like a (Monarch) Butterfly

I spent some time last year visiting a butterfly sanctuary in the cloud forest near Mashpi, Ecuador.  In this sanctuary, local support staff have identified 300 species of butterflies and have been able to reproduce 50 of them in a research facility referred to as the Life Center, which is basically a large, screened-in habitat for butterflies.  I watched intently ...

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Is It Time To Rethink The Scientific Method?

Designing an airplane has long been an exercise in tradeoffs. A larger airplane with more powerful engines can hold more people and go farther, but is costlier to run. A smaller one is more cost efficient, but lacks capacity. For decades, these have been nearly inviolable constraints that manufacturers just had to live with. Boeing’s new 787 Dreamliner is different. ...

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A New Breed of Innovation

A New Breed Of Innovation

By the mid-1980’s, the American semiconductor industry seemed like it was doomed. Although US firms had pioneered and dominated the technology for decades, they were now getting pummeled by cheaper Japanese imports. Much like cars and electronics, microchips seemed destined to become another symbol of American decline. The dire outlook had serious ramifications for both US competitiveness and national security. ...

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The Yin And Yang Of Elon Musk

At the recent Code Conference, Elon Musk had a wide ranging interview about everything from who he thinks will compete with Tesla in self-driving cars to neural laces that will augment human intelligence and his plans for space travel. But the thing that caught my eye was his assertion that we all are  might be living in a computer simulation. It’s a fantastical idea, ...

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To Adapt, We Need To Evolve

To Adapt, We Need To Evolve

When scientists decoded the human genome in 2001, they found something astounding. While our DNA provides the blueprint for everything about us—from how we develop in the womb to eye color and personality traits—it takes only 20,000 genes to do so, less than one fifth of what had previously been thought. What was even more mindblowing was the reason that they ...

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