Author Archives: Jeffrey Phillips

Making New Mistakes

Nothing is quite so frustrating as working with a client who claims to want and need innovation, but is paralyzed by indecision or doubt. Unless, of course, it is a client who has decided that regardless of the new ideas they generate, they will all fail, because of the mistakes they made in the past.

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Pay Attention!

You want to know what the biggest input gap is where innovation is concerned? Want to know what really matters when you are starting an innovation initiative? Did the bright sparkly pop-up advertisement steal your attention in the last 20 seconds? Did your email notification sound while reading this blog?

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Innovation Ignition

I read a lot about innovation, and I'm constantly amused by the articles that talk about "kick starting" innovation. If there is one activity that is resistant to forward motion based on one quick action like a kick start, it's innovation. What people who advocate "kick starting" innovation don't understand is the analogy, and the effort involved before the fact.

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Why the Front End of Innovation is Different

Let's assert that you've become very good at your job. Whether you are in finance, marketing or operations, your proficiency is based on your education and your work history. You know how to anticipate financial needs, or how to manufacture products more efficiently because you love what you do, you do it often and you are rewarded to do it well. You have deep knowledge about your chosen area of specialty and you can demonstrate expertise. Then along comes an innovation need.

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Why Kirk Beats Spock at Innovation

There's a mistake being played out in your organization when it comes to staffing innovation projects. You are likely staffing them with a bunch of "Spocks", people who know a lot about the subject and have deep expertise. While this may look like a dream team, I can assure you that staffing a bunch of Spocks is not helpful and can be harmful.

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Innovators are Unreasonable Networkers

John Stuart Mill lived at a time and in a place where the interaction of the various classes was limited, and when it occurred the conversation or interaction was one of disdain for the lower classes. Mill lived at a time of little change and great social unrest, but his goal was to create more progress. Today we live in a place where anyone can talk with anyone. Twitter, Facebook and other social media provide ever greater opportunities to exchange information and ideas with a wide range of people.

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