Open Innovation

How do Users Influence Innovation?

Innochat is a weekly Twitter chat involving a wide range of really interesting people from all over the world, linked by one thing – a deep interest and passion for innovation. One recent chat focused on the role of users and innovation. We tried to distinguish Lead Users (LUs), Early Adopters (EAs) and Brand Advocates (BA), and assess the impact each one has on innovation.

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Innovation and Diversity

"Tomorrow's management systems will need to value diversity, dissent and divergence as highly as conformance, consensus and cohesion" -- a tweet by Gary Hamel leads Ralph Ohr into the importance of Innovation and Diversity.

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Follow the Leaders of Open Innovation and Crowdsourcing – Part One

Although there are simple and cost effective ways to jumpstart your efforts – for example, leveraging a company like InnoCentive to host prize-based challenges in order to rapidly find solutions to your most pressing problems – leading organizations that wish to truly embrace open innovation and crowdsourcing do so through careful planning. When seeking to engage external talent, one of the first of many questions you must first ask yourself is: Why are we doing this? What do we hope that external talent can achieve for us that our internal talent cannot (or should not) achieve, and how do we integrate the two together?

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External Talent Strategies for a Global Talent Pool

The old way of winning the talent wars was to search for and hire the very best talent and keep them inside your own four walls by offering them competitive compensation, benefits, and perks. Your hope was that your talent is better than your competitors’ talent. But over the last couple of decades, companies have increasingly found that employees who pursue what they do with passion will outperform an employee with a gun to their head every time. Circuit City learned very publicly that people are not commodities and went out of business from treating them as if they were.

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Part II – Diversity in University Technology Transfer Strategy

Like socks labeled “one size fits all,” “one size fits all” university technology commercialization strategy is actually “one size fits no one.” There’s a yawning chasm between diverse, local realities, and what ultimately gets passed off as strategy in mainstream tech transfer policy discussions, scholarly articles, and training workshops. This article is Part II of an earlier article that explored five common challenges in bringing university research to market that hold true at many universities in the U.S.

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